clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Shutterstock

12 key Revolutionary War monuments in the Boston area, mapped

These include the nation’s oldest war memorial and cannon seized from the British army

View as Map

No other region in the nation has quite the connection to the Revolutionary War as does Boston and its environs (British-free since March 1776).

Not surprisingly, then, the area also hosts some of the country's most notable monuments and memorials commemorating the conflict.

Among these are the oldest intact war memorial in the United States and testaments to the first battles of the war, not to mention some cannon captured from George III’s army and never returned.

Read More

Minuteman Statue

Copy Link

Concord's Minuteman Statue dates from 1875. It looms in Minuteman National Park, which marks the first two battles of the Revolution.

Shutterstock

Lexington Minuteman Statue

Copy Link

Erected in 1900 and depicting militia Captain John Parker, the statue stands at one end of the Lexington Green, which is situated among the scene of the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

Shutterstock

Revolutionary Monument

Copy Link

Also on the Lexington Green, the Revolutionary Monument is the nation's oldest intact war memorial. It was dedicated on July 4, 1799.

In 1835, remains of soldiers who died in the battle there were transferred to the rear of the monument.

Mass. Office of Tourism

Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site

Copy Link

In late July 1775, George Washington established his headquarters for the Siege of Boston at this house, which John Vassall, a British loyalist, owned. Martha Washington joined the Continental Army commander here in December 1775.

 Writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made the house his home in the next century, hence its name.

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long walkway and lawn. Shutterstock

Cambridge Common Cannons

Copy Link

The Continental Army seized these three cannons after the British evacuated the Boston area in March 1776.

Three vintage cannons arrayed in a public park. Daderot/Wikipedia

Old Powder House

Copy Link

In September 1774, nearly 300 British troops stole gunpowder stored at the tower. The action shocked colonists and helped precipitate the war.

Wikipedia Common

Fort Washington Mounds

Copy Link

George Washington ordered three batteries to be built for cannon aimed at the British then stationed in Boston across the river.

These mounds are what’s left, the last reminder of the Continental Army’s Cambridge presence that dates uninterrupted to the 18th century.

The park also includes five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, including of four Continental Army troops.

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

George Washington Equestrian Statue

Copy Link

At 38 feet high (with 11 feet underground mooring it), this bronze monument depicting the first president in his Revolutionary garb is one of Boston’s biggest single pieces of public art.

Thomas Ball sculpted it, and it was unveiled in 1869.

Shutterstock

Bunker Hill Monument

Copy Link

The monument commemorates the first major battle of the Revolutionary War on June 17, 1775. It was technically a British win, though the steadfastness of American soldiers signaled a longer conflict to come.

The 221-foot obelisk—with a statue of American commander William Prescott in front—dates from 1842 and its interior is open most days for climbing; and there’s a museum across the street dedicated to the battle and the surrounding Charlestown neighborhood.

Robert Glusic/Getty Images

Boston Massacre Memorial

Copy Link

In March 1770, British soldiers opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators, killing five and wounding 11. The event was part of a chain reaction that led to the war.

A round bronze marker built into the sidewalk of a city street. Shutterstock

Paul Revere House

Copy Link

The revolutionary and his family occupied this house dating from 1680 for much of the time between 1770 and 1800.

It is a monument to Revere’s contributions to American independence as well as a neat peak into life in Boston 200-plus years ago.

The exterior of the 17th-century Paul Revere House. Shutterstock

Dorchester Heights Monument

Copy Link

As the City of Boston puts it, "Dorchester Heights is famous for a battle that never happened." Basically, the British ceded the heights to Washington's fortified troops there, and evacuated Boston in March 1776.

The marble monument atop the heights was dedicated in 1902.

Shutterstock

Minuteman Statue

Shutterstock

Concord's Minuteman Statue dates from 1875. It looms in Minuteman National Park, which marks the first two battles of the Revolution.

Shutterstock

Lexington Minuteman Statue

Shutterstock

Erected in 1900 and depicting militia Captain John Parker, the statue stands at one end of the Lexington Green, which is situated among the scene of the first battle of the Revolutionary War.

Shutterstock

Revolutionary Monument

Mass. Office of Tourism

Also on the Lexington Green, the Revolutionary Monument is the nation's oldest intact war memorial. It was dedicated on July 4, 1799.

In 1835, remains of soldiers who died in the battle there were transferred to the rear of the monument.

Mass. Office of Tourism

Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long walkway and lawn. Shutterstock

In late July 1775, George Washington established his headquarters for the Siege of Boston at this house, which John Vassall, a British loyalist, owned. Martha Washington joined the Continental Army commander here in December 1775.

 Writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made the house his home in the next century, hence its name.

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long walkway and lawn. Shutterstock

Cambridge Common Cannons

Three vintage cannons arrayed in a public park. Daderot/Wikipedia

The Continental Army seized these three cannons after the British evacuated the Boston area in March 1776.

Three vintage cannons arrayed in a public park. Daderot/Wikipedia

Old Powder House

Wikipedia Common

In September 1774, nearly 300 British troops stole gunpowder stored at the tower. The action shocked colonists and helped precipitate the war.

Wikipedia Common

Fort Washington Mounds

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

George Washington ordered three batteries to be built for cannon aimed at the British then stationed in Boston across the river.

These mounds are what’s left, the last reminder of the Continental Army’s Cambridge presence that dates uninterrupted to the 18th century.

The park also includes five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, including of four Continental Army troops.

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

George Washington Equestrian Statue

Shutterstock

At 38 feet high (with 11 feet underground mooring it), this bronze monument depicting the first president in his Revolutionary garb is one of Boston’s biggest single pieces of public art.

Thomas Ball sculpted it, and it was unveiled in 1869.

Shutterstock

Bunker Hill Monument

Robert Glusic/Getty Images

The monument commemorates the first major battle of the Revolutionary War on June 17, 1775. It was technically a British win, though the steadfastness of American soldiers signaled a longer conflict to come.

The 221-foot obelisk—with a statue of American commander William Prescott in front—dates from 1842 and its interior is open most days for climbing; and there’s a museum across the street dedicated to the battle and the surrounding Charlestown neighborhood.

Robert Glusic/Getty Images

Boston Massacre Memorial

A round bronze marker built into the sidewalk of a city street. Shutterstock

In March 1770, British soldiers opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators, killing five and wounding 11. The event was part of a chain reaction that led to the war.

A round bronze marker built into the sidewalk of a city street. Shutterstock

Paul Revere House

The exterior of the 17th-century Paul Revere House. Shutterstock

The revolutionary and his family occupied this house dating from 1680 for much of the time between 1770 and 1800.

It is a monument to Revere’s contributions to American independence as well as a neat peak into life in Boston 200-plus years ago.

The exterior of the 17th-century Paul Revere House. Shutterstock

Dorchester Heights Monument

Shutterstock

As the City of Boston puts it, "Dorchester Heights is famous for a battle that never happened." Basically, the British ceded the heights to Washington's fortified troops there, and evacuated Boston in March 1776.

The marble monument atop the heights was dedicated in 1902.

Shutterstock