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A bronze statue of a man partially enclosed in an open-air stone statue. Shutterstock

29 Boston-area military memorials and monuments, mapped

These markers include the oldest Revolutionary War, Vietnam War, and Afghanistan/Iraq memorials in the U.S.

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These memorials and monuments commemorate events, battles, and wars stretching back to the earliest days of the American Revolution and encompassing more recent conflicts such as the war in Afghanistan and the bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut.

Most are easily accessible, including via public transit, and are free to the public. If we’re missing any major ones you think should be included, please let us know.

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1. Concord Minute Man statue

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Monument St
Concord, MA 01742
(978) 369-6993
Visit Website

Concord’s Minuteman statue dates from 1875.

It looms in Minute Man National Park, which marks the first two battles of the Revolution.

A bronze statue of a man with a riffle. Shutterstock

2. Revolutionary Monument

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Located on the Lexington Green, the Revolutionary Monument is the nation’s oldest intact war memorial. It was dedicated on July 4, 1799.

In 1835, remains of soldiers who died in the Battle of Lexington there were transferred to the rear of the monument.

A small obelisk with writing on the front. Shutterstock

3. Lexington minuteman statue

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& Hwy 225
Lexington, MA 02421

Erected in 1900 and depicting militia Captain John Parker, the statue looms at one end of Lexington Common, which is situated among the scene of the first battle in the Revolutionary War.

A bronze statue of a man with a rifle. Shutterstock

4. Roslindale World War I Memorial

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(617) 635-4505
Visit Website

It took until 1958—40 years after the war’s end and after another world war—to complete the monument to Roslindale’s Great War fallen.

It was later adjusted to honor the fallen of Korea and Vietnam as well.

5. Spanish-American War statue

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29 Garden St
Cambridge, MA 02138

This statue of a solder in a small park where Concord Avenue and Garden Street intersect commemorates those who served during the Spanish-American War as well as during the occupation of the Philippines and parts of China.

Alice Ruggles Kitson designed it (and many like it around the commonwealth and the U.S.).

6. British cannon in Cambridge Common

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Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 349-4639
Visit Website

George Washington’s army seized these three cannons after the British evacuated the Boston area in March 1776.

Three vintage cannons arrayed in a public park. Wikipedia

7. Lincoln-Soldier Monument on Cambridge Common

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Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 349-4639
Visit Website

Completed in 1871, this monument on Cambridge Common commemorating the city’s war dead includes a statue at the top of a Civil War soldier and a bronze of President Lincoln below.

Twin brothers Cyrus and Darius Cobb designed it.

A tall monument with a soldier at the top done in stone and a bronze of a tall man, Abraham Lincoln, farther down. Shutterstock

8. Old Powder House

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Powder House Square
Somerville, MA

In September 1774, nearly 300 British troops stole gunpowder stored at the tower.

The action shocked colonists and helped precipitate the Revolutionary War.

9. Jamaica Plain monument

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776 Centre St
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

The 27-foot monument was unveiled in 1871 to commemorate the Civil War contributions of the then-Town of West Roxbury.

10. Memorial Hall

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Memorial Hall, 45 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Finished in 1877, the hall continues as a monument to those Harvard students and alum who died fighting for the United States during the Civil War (Confederate casualties are not mentioned).

The interior of a grand hall, with an arched ceiling and commemorative plaques on the walls. Shutterstock

11. Fort Washington Park

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95 Waverly St
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 349-6200
Visit Website

George Washington ordered three batteries to be built for cannon aimed at British-occupied Boston across the river.

These mounds are what’s left, the last reminder dating uninterrupted to the 18th century of the Continental Army’s Cambridge presence.

The cut metal figures in the park include four meant to represent Continental Army soldiers.

Three cut metal figures representing 18th-century soldiers in a public park. Shutterstock

12. Vietnam Memorial Park

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100 Park Dr
Boston, MA 02215

This park within the Back Bay Fens includes a monument honoring those killed during the Vietnam War and a map on the ground of Vietnam itself.

13. World War II Memorial Park

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Back Bay Fens
Boston, MA

Located in the Back Bay Fens and erected in 1949, this monument built around a winged Victory memorializes the more than 3,000 Bostonians who died in Second World War.

14. Soldiers and Sailors Monument

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45 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02108

Completed in 1877 on the highest point on Boston Common, the memorial honors Bostonians who fought for the United States during the Civil War.

A tall, cylindrical monument with a bronze statue on top. Shutterstock

15. Joseph Hooker statue

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24 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02133

Unveiled in 1903, this statue outside of the Massachusetts State House commemorates Joseph Hooker, who commanded the Army of the Potomac in 1863 and famously declared, “May God have mercy on General Lee, for I will have none.”

A bronze statue of a man on horseback. Shutterstock

16. Hall of Flags

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24 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02133

This marble hall in the Massachusetts State House commemorates Massachusetts soldiers who fought in conflicts stretching back to the Revolution.

It draws its name from a tradition, dating back to the Civil War, of Massachusetts service members donating flags to the commonwealth. (Though the flags on display are really replicas, with the originals with textile conservators.)

A rotunda with a stained-glass ceiling and flags arrayed around the rotunda. Shutterstock

17. Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Memorial

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(617) 742-5415
Visit Website

The sculpture commemorating the Civil War role of the 54th Massachusetts, the first all-black regiment in the American army, and that of its commander, Robert Gould Shaw, took sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens nearly 14 years to complete.

It was unveiled in 1897. It is due to be removed in spring 2020 for several months of restoration work.

A bronze relief of an officer on horseback and his soldiers around him. Shutterstock

18. Bunker Hill Monument

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Monument Sq
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 242-5641
Visit Website

The monument commemorates the first major battle of the Revolutionary War on June 17, 1775. It was technically a British win, though the steadfastness of American soldiers signaled a longer conflict to come.

The 221-foot obelisk dates from 1842 and its interior is open most days for climbing; and there’s a museum across the street dedicated to the battle and the surrounding Charlestown neighborhood.

An aerial view of city buildings in Boston. In the foreground is a tall monument. In the distance is a body of water and a skyline with many buildings. Shutterstock

19. Charlestown Civil War memorial

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Winthrop Square
Boston, MA 02110

Dating from 1872, this granite memorial commemorates U.S. soldiers and sailors from Charlestown who fought in the Civil War.

It is located in the same field where colonial minutemen trained during the Revolution.

A wide view of a stone-mounted memorial with statues on top. Shutterstock

20. Boston Massacre site

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206 Washington St
Boston, MA 02109
(617) 357-8300
Visit Website

In March 1770, British soldiers opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators, killing five and wounding 11. The event helped spark the Revolutionary War.

A round bronze marker built into the sidewalk of a city street. Shutterstock

21. U.S.S. Constitution and USS Constitution Museum

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Building 22, Charlestown Navy Yard
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617) 426-1812
Visit Website

Honoring the world’s oldest naval vessel still afloat (born: 1797), the museum especially chronicles Old Ironsides role in the War of 1812.

The ship itself is available for tours.

A cannon facing away from a ship hole. Shutterstock

22. Old North Church Memorial Garden

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Established in 2006, this garden was the first public memorial to those killed during the Second Iraq War and the war in Afghanistan.

To this day, whenever an American is killed serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, an Old North Church gardener adds a nameless dog tag to the memorial.

Dozens of dog tags hanging together against a brick background in a memorial garden. Shutterstock

23. Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memorial

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Charlestown Naval Shipyard Park I
Charlestown, MA 02129

The memorial to the more than 1,500 Massachusetts casualties in the war—and the dozens still missing—is located in the Charlestown Navy Yard and was finished in 1993.

A bronze statue of a man partially enclosed in an open-air stone statue. Shutterstock

24. Beirut bombing memorial

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(617) 635-7275
Visit Website

Located in Christopher Columbus Park and unveiled in 1992, this monument commemorates those killed in the 1983 terrorist attack on a Marine barracks in the Lebanese capital.

A circular memorial built into a park, with a taller wall on one end of the circle. Gibson Sotheby’s/Boston Herald/Getty

25. Dorchester Heights monument

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Thomas Park
Boston, MA 02127

Located at the center of Thomas park, this marble monument dating from 1902 commemorates “a battle that never happened,” according to the City of Boston.

That is, the British ceded the heights to George Washington’s fortified troops there, and evacuated Boston in March 1776.

A tall stone tower. Shutterstock

26. Dorchester Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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172 Morrissey Blvd
Boston, MA 02125

This granite monument dates from 2006, and honors those from Dorchester killed during the Vietnam War.

27. Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial

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105 Northern Ave
Boston, MA 02210

This 50-foot, five-sided obelisk honors service members with Massachusetts ties who have died fighting since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

The memorial, which was rededicated in May 2019, also includes what its designers called a Memorial Grove.

People standing before a transparent glass memorial with names on the glass. Boston Globe via Getty Images

28. South Boston Vietnam War Memorial

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775 E 1st St
Boston, MA 02127
(617) 635-4505
Visit Website

Located in Medal of Honor Park (sometimes called M Street Park), this monument commemorates those from South Boston who died fighting in Vietnam. Everyone listed came to the park as children.

The monument dates from 1981, making it quite possibly the oldest Vietnam War memorial in the country. It was rededicated in September 2019.

29. South Boston Korean War Memorial

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2080 William J Day Blvd
Boston, MA 02127

The Castle Island monument dating from 1993 honors the 20 Southie men who died in the early 1950s war.

1. Concord Minute Man statue

Monument St, Concord, MA 01742
A bronze statue of a man with a riffle. Shutterstock

Concord’s Minuteman statue dates from 1875.

It looms in Minute Man National Park, which marks the first two battles of the Revolution.

Monument St
Concord, MA 01742

2. Revolutionary Monument

Lexington, MA 02421
A small obelisk with writing on the front. Shutterstock

Located on the Lexington Green, the Revolutionary Monument is the nation’s oldest intact war memorial. It was dedicated on July 4, 1799.

In 1835, remains of soldiers who died in the Battle of Lexington there were transferred to the rear of the monument.

3. Lexington minuteman statue

& Hwy 225, Lexington, MA 02421
A bronze statue of a man with a rifle. Shutterstock

Erected in 1900 and depicting militia Captain John Parker, the statue looms at one end of Lexington Common, which is situated among the scene of the first battle in the Revolutionary War.

& Hwy 225
Lexington, MA 02421

4. Roslindale World War I Memorial

Boston, MA 02131

It took until 1958—40 years after the war’s end and after another world war—to complete the monument to Roslindale’s Great War fallen.

It was later adjusted to honor the fallen of Korea and Vietnam as well.

5. Spanish-American War statue

29 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138

This statue of a solder in a small park where Concord Avenue and Garden Street intersect commemorates those who served during the Spanish-American War as well as during the occupation of the Philippines and parts of China.

Alice Ruggles Kitson designed it (and many like it around the commonwealth and the U.S.).

29 Garden St
Cambridge, MA 02138

6. British cannon in Cambridge Common

Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138
Three vintage cannons arrayed in a public park. Wikipedia

George Washington’s army seized these three cannons after the British evacuated the Boston area in March 1776.

Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138

7. Lincoln-Soldier Monument on Cambridge Common

Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138
A tall monument with a soldier at the top done in stone and a bronze of a tall man, Abraham Lincoln, farther down. Shutterstock

Completed in 1871, this monument on Cambridge Common commemorating the city’s war dead includes a statue at the top of a Civil War soldier and a bronze of President Lincoln below.

Twin brothers Cyrus and Darius Cobb designed it.

Waterhouse St & Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138

8. Old Powder House

Powder House Square, Somerville, MA

In September 1774, nearly 300 British troops stole gunpowder stored at the tower.

The action shocked colonists and helped precipitate the Revolutionary War.

Powder House Square
Somerville, MA

9. Jamaica Plain monument

776 Centre St, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

The 27-foot monument was unveiled in 1871 to commemorate the Civil War contributions of the then-Town of West Roxbury.

776 Centre St
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

10. Memorial Hall

Memorial Hall, 45 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138
The interior of a grand hall, with an arched ceiling and commemorative plaques on the walls. Shutterstock

Finished in 1877, the hall continues as a monument to those Harvard students and alum who died fighting for the United States during the Civil War (Confederate casualties are not mentioned).

Memorial Hall, 45 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

11. Fort Washington Park

95 Waverly St, Cambridge, MA 02139
Three cut metal figures representing 18th-century soldiers in a public park. Shutterstock

George Washington ordered three batteries to be built for cannon aimed at British-occupied Boston across the river.

These mounds are what’s left, the last reminder dating uninterrupted to the 18th century of the Continental Army’s Cambridge presence.

The cut metal figures in the park include four meant to represent Continental Army soldiers.

95 Waverly St
Cambridge, MA 02139

12. Vietnam Memorial Park

100 Park Dr, Boston, MA 02215

This park within the Back Bay Fens includes a monument honoring those killed during the Vietnam War and a map on the ground of Vietnam itself.

100 Park Dr
Boston, MA 02215

13. World War II Memorial Park

Back Bay Fens, Boston, MA

Located in the Back Bay Fens and erected in 1949, this monument built around a winged Victory memorializes the more than 3,000 Bostonians who died in Second World War.

Back Bay Fens
Boston, MA

14. Soldiers and Sailors Monument

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108
A tall, cylindrical monument with a bronze statue on top. Shutterstock

Completed in 1877 on the highest point on Boston Common, the memorial honors Bostonians who fought for the United States during the Civil War.

45 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02108

15. Joseph Hooker statue

24 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02133
A bronze statue of a man on horseback. Shutterstock

Unveiled in 1903, this statue outside of the Massachusetts State House commemorates Joseph Hooker, who commanded the Army of the Potomac in 1863 and famously declared, “May God have mercy on General Lee, for I will have none.”

24 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02133

16. Hall of Flags

24 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02133
A rotunda with a stained-glass ceiling and flags arrayed around the rotunda. Shutterstock

This marble hall in the Massachusetts State House commemorates Massachusetts soldiers who fought in conflicts stretching back to the Revolution.

It draws its name from a tradition, dating back to the Civil War, of Massachusetts service members donating flags to the commonwealth. (Though the flags on display are really replicas, with the originals with textile conservators.)

24 Beacon St
Boston, MA 02133

17. Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Memorial

Boston, MA 02108
A bronze relief of an officer on horseback and his soldiers around him. Shutterstock

The sculpture commemorating the Civil War role of the 54th Massachusetts, the first all-black regiment in the American army, and that of its commander, Robert Gould Shaw, took sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens nearly 14 years to complete.

It was unveiled in 1897. It is due to be removed in spring 2020 for several months of restoration work.

18. Bunker Hill Monument

Monument Sq, Charlestown, MA 02129
An aerial view of city buildings in Boston. In the foreground is a tall monument. In the distance is a body of water and a skyline with many buildings. Shutterstock

The monument commemorates the first major battle of the Revolutionary War on June 17, 1775. It was technically a British win, though the steadfastness of American soldiers signaled a longer conflict to come.

The 221-foot obelisk dates from 1842 and its interior is open most days for climbing; and there’s a museum across the street dedicated to the battle and the surrounding Charlestown neighborhood.

Monument Sq
Charlestown, MA 02129

19. Charlestown Civil War memorial

Winthrop Square, Boston, MA 02110
A wide view of a stone-mounted memorial with statues on top. Shutterstock

Dating from 1872, this granite memorial commemorates U.S. soldiers and sailors from Charlestown who fought in the Civil War.

It is located in the same field where colonial minutemen trained during the Revolution.

Winthrop Square
Boston, MA 02110

20. Boston Massacre site

206 Washington St, Boston, MA 02109
A round bronze marker built into the sidewalk of a city street. Shutterstock

In March 1770, British soldiers opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators, killing five and wounding 11. The event helped spark the Revolutionary War.

206 Washington St
Boston, MA 02109

21. U.S.S. Constitution and USS Constitution Museum

Building 22, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, MA 02129
A cannon facing away from a ship hole. Shutterstock

Honoring the world’s oldest naval vessel still afloat (born: 1797), the museum especially chronicles Old Ironsides role in the War of 1812.

The ship itself is available for tours.

Building 22, Charlestown Navy Yard
Charlestown, MA 02129

22. Old North Church Memorial Garden

Boston, MA 02113
Dozens of dog tags hanging together against a brick background in a memorial garden. Shutterstock

Established in 2006, this garden was the first public memorial to those killed during the Second Iraq War and the war in Afghanistan.

To this day, whenever an American is killed serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, an Old North Church gardener adds a nameless dog tag to the memorial.

23. Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memorial

Charlestown Naval Shipyard Park I, Charlestown, MA 02129
A bronze statue of a man partially enclosed in an open-air stone statue. Shutterstock

The memorial to the more than 1,500 Massachusetts casualties in the war—and the dozens still missing—is located in the Charlestown Navy Yard and was finished in 1993.

Charlestown Naval Shipyard Park I
Charlestown, MA 02129

24. Beirut bombing memorial

Boston, MA 02110
A circular memorial built into a park, with a taller wall on one end of the circle. Gibson Sotheby’s/Boston Herald/Getty

Located in Christopher Columbus Park and unveiled in 1992, this monument commemorates those killed in the 1983 terrorist attack on a Marine barracks in the Lebanese capital.

25. Dorchester Heights monument

Thomas Park, Boston, MA 02127
A tall stone tower. Shutterstock

Located at the center of Thomas park, this marble monument dating from 1902 commemorates “a battle that never happened,” according to the City of Boston.

That is, the British ceded the heights to George Washington’s fortified troops there, and evacuated Boston in March 1776.

Thomas Park
Boston, MA 02127

26. Dorchester Vietnam Veterans Memorial

172 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125

This granite monument dates from 2006, and honors those from Dorchester killed during the Vietnam War.

172 Morrissey Blvd
Boston, MA 02125

27. Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial

105 Northern Ave, Boston, MA 02210
People standing before a transparent glass memorial with names on the glass. Boston Globe via Getty Images

This 50-foot, five-sided obelisk honors service members with Massachusetts ties who have died fighting since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

The memorial, which was rededicated in May 2019, also includes what its designers called a Memorial Grove.

105 Northern Ave
Boston, MA 02210

28. South Boston Vietnam War Memorial

775 E 1st St, Boston, MA 02127

Located in Medal of Honor Park (sometimes called M Street Park), this monument commemorates those from South Boston who died fighting in Vietnam. Everyone listed came to the park as children.

The monument dates from 1981, making it quite possibly the oldest Vietnam War memorial in the country. It was rededicated in September 2019.

775 E 1st St
Boston, MA 02127

29. South Boston Korean War Memorial

2080 William J Day Blvd, Boston, MA 02127

The Castle Island monument dating from 1993 honors the 20 Southie men who died in the early 1950s war.

2080 William J Day Blvd
Boston, MA 02127