clock menu more-arrow no yes

7 Cambridge Tourism Spots Not Harvard- and M.I.T.-Related

View as Map

So the City of Cambridge has had with tourists visiting only M.I.T. and Harvard and then either heading home or heading over the bridges to Boston for more sight-seeing. They have launched a campaign to get people to take in more of the town beyond its two big universities. To help things along, we've mapped several potential tourist attractions that have absolutely no direct relation to either M.I.T. or Harvard. In other words, you won't find an affiliated museum or arboretum in this bunch. Instead, we've got stuff for the history buff (George Washington slept here!), the foodie (Julia Child shopped here!) and the exercise fiend (who knows who biked here!). Go.


· Our Curbed Maps archive [Curbed Boston]

Read More

1. Cambridge Common Cannons

Copy Link
Garden Street & Appian Way, Harvard University, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Cambridge, MA 02138

These three cannon were seized by Washington’s army after the British evacuated the Boston area in 1776. There are other Revolutionary-related markers in the Common as well, including the tree beneath which Washington supposedly took command of the Continental Army.

2. Mount Auburn Cemetery

Copy Link
580 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 607-1980
Visit Website

This cemetery includes more than 900 people who served during the Civil War. The big sphinx statue, in fact, is a memorial to those who died in the war. The cemetery offers regular group tours.

3. Longfellow House Washington's Headquarters

Copy Link
105 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

The house served as headquarters for George Washington during the Siege of Boston from July 1775 to April 1776. It was later the home of poetry giant Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It is open during the summer for regular tours.

4. Fort Washington Park

Copy Link
Waverly Street
Cambridge, MA 02139

This park sports not only the oldest surviving fortification from the Revolutionary War, but five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, four minutemen and a Victorian-era woman, to commemorate George Washington’s siege of Boston.

5. Charles River Frontage

Copy Link
Memorial Drive & John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Cambridge has roughly eight miles of Charles River frontage, much of it speckled with easily accessible bike and running paths as well as benches, picnic areas, boathouses, oh my!

6. Julia Child Landmarks

Copy Link
103 Irving Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Julia Child lived for decades in the house at 103 Irving Street, just east of Harvard (it's a private home, still, so please don't ring the doorbell). She shopped for ingredients at Savenor's nearby at 92 Kirkland Street and received the Legion of Honor from the French government at the Meridien Hotel at 20 Sidney Street.

7. Minuteman Bikeway Path

Copy Link
Alewife Brook Parkway
Cambridge, MA 02138

With an entrance just to the west of the Alewife Red Line stop, this 11-mile bike and hike trail runs along where the earliest fighting of the American Revolution took place. There are stops along the way for souvenirs and food.

1. Cambridge Common Cannons

Garden Street & Appian Way, Harvard University, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Cambridge, MA 02138

These three cannon were seized by Washington’s army after the British evacuated the Boston area in 1776. There are other Revolutionary-related markers in the Common as well, including the tree beneath which Washington supposedly took command of the Continental Army.

Garden Street & Appian Way, Harvard University, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Cambridge, MA 02138

2. Mount Auburn Cemetery

580 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

This cemetery includes more than 900 people who served during the Civil War. The big sphinx statue, in fact, is a memorial to those who died in the war. The cemetery offers regular group tours.

580 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

3. Longfellow House Washington's Headquarters

105 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

The house served as headquarters for George Washington during the Siege of Boston from July 1775 to April 1776. It was later the home of poetry giant Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It is open during the summer for regular tours.

105 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

4. Fort Washington Park

Waverly Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

This park sports not only the oldest surviving fortification from the Revolutionary War, but five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, four minutemen and a Victorian-era woman, to commemorate George Washington’s siege of Boston.

Waverly Street
Cambridge, MA 02139

5. Charles River Frontage

Memorial Drive & John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Cambridge has roughly eight miles of Charles River frontage, much of it speckled with easily accessible bike and running paths as well as benches, picnic areas, boathouses, oh my!

Memorial Drive & John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

6. Julia Child Landmarks

103 Irving Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Julia Child lived for decades in the house at 103 Irving Street, just east of Harvard (it's a private home, still, so please don't ring the doorbell). She shopped for ingredients at Savenor's nearby at 92 Kirkland Street and received the Legion of Honor from the French government at the Meridien Hotel at 20 Sidney Street.

103 Irving Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

7. Minuteman Bikeway Path

Alewife Brook Parkway, Cambridge, MA 02138

With an entrance just to the west of the Alewife Red Line stop, this 11-mile bike and hike trail runs along where the earliest fighting of the American Revolution took place. There are stops along the way for souvenirs and food.

Alewife Brook Parkway
Cambridge, MA 02138