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Charlestown in two hours: What to see when you don't have all day

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Charlestown is one of the oldest parts of Boston (a city it joined only in 1874before that, stretching back to the 17th century, it was its own municipality). Consequently, it's got a whole mess of history within its environs. Plus, parts of it are just gorgeous. How to take it all in when you don't have all day or when you have other plans (like touring the North End or Beacon Hill, say)?

This is how! The Curbed Boston Two-Hour Guide to Charlestown takes visitors to the neighborhood's essential spots. These must-see sites are all close enough together geographically to make them doable in 120 minutes, tops.

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U.S.S. Constitution

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The Navy's oldest commissioned ship, "Old Ironsides" is currently being reclad. Visitors can still board it as well as check out the neighboring museum dedicated to the heavy frigate first launched in 1797.

Bunker Hill Monument

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The 221-foot obelisk was dedicated and opened in 1843 to commemorate the June 1775 battle of the same name, the first major fight of the Revolutionary War. The colonists technically lost, but the British sustained so many casualties that Bunker Hill proved a wake-up call: This American affair would be no mere uprising. Visitors can climb all the way to the tip-top for some nice Charlestown views and then recover on the sloping law afterward.

Charlestown Navy Yard

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The yard dates from 1800 and was a working part of the Navy until 1974. A vast part of it is now a national park, including the part encompassing the U.S.S. Constitution and its museum. It also provides some stellar views of downtown Boston and Eastie.

The Battle Of Bunker Hill Museum

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The museum across the street from the monument not only tells the revolutionary past of the neighborhood, including the story of the famous battle, but more recent history as well. Plus, there's public restrooms!

St. Mary-St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church

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Patrick Keely, basically the starchitect of Catholic churches in America in the 19th century, designed this building in the late 1880s. Of particular interest is the hammer-beam oak ceiling.

Warren Tavern

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The oldest bar in Massachusetts dates from 1780, and was a favorite of Paul Revere. George Washington stopped by, too, when he was in town. Might as well end the tour here, eh?

U.S.S. Constitution

The Navy's oldest commissioned ship, "Old Ironsides" is currently being reclad. Visitors can still board it as well as check out the neighboring museum dedicated to the heavy frigate first launched in 1797.

Bunker Hill Monument

The 221-foot obelisk was dedicated and opened in 1843 to commemorate the June 1775 battle of the same name, the first major fight of the Revolutionary War. The colonists technically lost, but the British sustained so many casualties that Bunker Hill proved a wake-up call: This American affair would be no mere uprising. Visitors can climb all the way to the tip-top for some nice Charlestown views and then recover on the sloping law afterward.

Charlestown Navy Yard

The yard dates from 1800 and was a working part of the Navy until 1974. A vast part of it is now a national park, including the part encompassing the U.S.S. Constitution and its museum. It also provides some stellar views of downtown Boston and Eastie.

The Battle Of Bunker Hill Museum

The museum across the street from the monument not only tells the revolutionary past of the neighborhood, including the story of the famous battle, but more recent history as well. Plus, there's public restrooms!

St. Mary-St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church

Patrick Keely, basically the starchitect of Catholic churches in America in the 19th century, designed this building in the late 1880s. Of particular interest is the hammer-beam oak ceiling.

Warren Tavern

The oldest bar in Massachusetts dates from 1780, and was a favorite of Paul Revere. George Washington stopped by, too, when he was in town. Might as well end the tour here, eh?