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A three-story, square building on a street corner.
The Warren Tavern in 1972.
Boston Globe via Getty Images

George Washington in the Boston area, mapped

The first president and Continental Army commander was all over the region in 1775 and 1776

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The Warren Tavern in 1972.
| Boston Globe via Getty Images

George Washington spent a considerable amount of time in the Boston area from the spring of 1775 through the spring of 1776. He had to: The Siege of Boston was underway as the first major military contest of the American Revolution.

He also returned as president in October 1789.

Here is a map of where Washington spent both jags as well as the surviving signs of his presence in the area.

[Sources not otherwise linked to: MountVernon.org; WalkingBoston.com]

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Royall House and Slave Quarters

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Confiscated from a Tory named Isaac Royall who fled to England, this estate—which included what were probably the largest slave quarters in Massachusetts—housed some of Washington’s top officers and was visited by the man himself.

Up close on the exterior of a three-story, rectangular house. Shutterstock

Cambridge Common

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It's a myth that Washington took command under the Common's so-called Washington Elm (the original tree associated with the myth died in the 1920s anyway). But he did train troops on the Common.

And there are reminders of that fact in the form of a trio of cannons seized from the British still on display there.

Longfellow National Historic Site

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In late July 1775, Washington established his headquarters for the siege at this house, which John Vassall, a British loyalist, owned. Martha Washington joined the general here in December 1775.

Writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made the house his home in the next century, hence its name.

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long path and lawn. Shutterstock

Christ Church Cambridge

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Washington's army used this Episcopalian church as a barracks during the siege, but Martha Washington requested a service be held here on New Year's Eve 1775. The general was in attendance.

Warren Tavern

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Washington dropped in on this pub built in 1780 during an October 1789 visit that was part of the relatively new president's tour of the relatively young nation.

A three-story, square building housing a tavern on a street corner. Shutterstock

Wadsworth House

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This Harvard building was Washington's first headquarters during the Siege of Boston. He and his staff occupied it for a couple of weeks in early July 1775.

A small, square, two-story house on a sidewalk. Shutterstock

Faneuil Hall

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Washington was the guest of honor at a banquet here on October 27, 1789.

The front of a squat, triangular-roofed building with a bronze statue of man with folded arms outside. Shutterstock

King's Chapel

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On that same October 27, 1789, Washington attended a concert at the church and sat in the Governor's Pew (which is still there).

A squarish church building in a city with columns in the front and a steeple up top. Shutterstock

John Hancock's house

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The house of the first governor of Massachusetts under the state's constitution was unceremoniously demolished in 1863. (It’s pictured here in around 1860.)

Seventy-four years earlier, in October 1789, it (and Governor Hancock) hosted George Washington.

Fort Washington Park

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This park sports not only clear vestiges of the oldest surviving fortification from the Revolutionary War—one Washington ordered erected—but five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, including of four Continental Army troops.

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

Old Trinity Church

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Washington worshiped here on October 25, 1789, during that presidential tour.

This version of Trinity Church burned down in the great fire that swept downtown Boston in 1872.

Royall House and Slave Quarters

Up close on the exterior of a three-story, rectangular house. Shutterstock

Confiscated from a Tory named Isaac Royall who fled to England, this estate—which included what were probably the largest slave quarters in Massachusetts—housed some of Washington’s top officers and was visited by the man himself.

Up close on the exterior of a three-story, rectangular house. Shutterstock

Cambridge Common

It's a myth that Washington took command under the Common's so-called Washington Elm (the original tree associated with the myth died in the 1920s anyway). But he did train troops on the Common.

And there are reminders of that fact in the form of a trio of cannons seized from the British still on display there.

Longfellow National Historic Site

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long path and lawn. Shutterstock

In late July 1775, Washington established his headquarters for the siege at this house, which John Vassall, a British loyalist, owned. Martha Washington joined the general here in December 1775.

Writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made the house his home in the next century, hence its name.

A stately two-story mansion at the end of a long path and lawn. Shutterstock

Christ Church Cambridge

Washington's army used this Episcopalian church as a barracks during the siege, but Martha Washington requested a service be held here on New Year's Eve 1775. The general was in attendance.

Warren Tavern

A three-story, square building housing a tavern on a street corner. Shutterstock

Washington dropped in on this pub built in 1780 during an October 1789 visit that was part of the relatively new president's tour of the relatively young nation.

A three-story, square building housing a tavern on a street corner. Shutterstock

Wadsworth House

A small, square, two-story house on a sidewalk. Shutterstock

This Harvard building was Washington's first headquarters during the Siege of Boston. He and his staff occupied it for a couple of weeks in early July 1775.

A small, square, two-story house on a sidewalk. Shutterstock

Faneuil Hall

The front of a squat, triangular-roofed building with a bronze statue of man with folded arms outside. Shutterstock

Washington was the guest of honor at a banquet here on October 27, 1789.

The front of a squat, triangular-roofed building with a bronze statue of man with folded arms outside. Shutterstock

King's Chapel

A squarish church building in a city with columns in the front and a steeple up top. Shutterstock

On that same October 27, 1789, Washington attended a concert at the church and sat in the Governor's Pew (which is still there).

A squarish church building in a city with columns in the front and a steeple up top. Shutterstock

John Hancock's house

The house of the first governor of Massachusetts under the state's constitution was unceremoniously demolished in 1863. (It’s pictured here in around 1860.)

Seventy-four years earlier, in October 1789, it (and Governor Hancock) hosted George Washington.

Fort Washington Park

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

This park sports not only clear vestiges of the oldest surviving fortification from the Revolutionary War—one Washington ordered erected—but five life-size, painted-steel silhouettes, including of four Continental Army troops.

Three steel statues of Revolutionary War soldiers holding muskets in a snow-covered park. Shutterstock

Old Trinity Church

Washington worshiped here on October 25, 1789, during that presidential tour.

This version of Trinity Church burned down in the great fire that swept downtown Boston in 1872.