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Newer Boston addresses people will hail 50 years from now

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Not all of Boston's newer buildings are all that aesthetically spectacular (nor do they have to be—sometimes a condo is simply a condo).

Some are spectacular, though, and future generations will regard them as bold for their time and worth protecting, much as we look back on the likes of the Pru from the mid-1960s or the Custom House Tower, for that matter, from 50 years before that.

These are the addresses our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will hail as noteworthy. They include ones recently opened as well as properties under construction and planned.

If we're missing any in your estimation, get at us in the comments section.

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1. Millennium Tower

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1 Franklin St
Boston, MA 02110

Designed by Blake Middleton of Handel Architects and built on most of the site of the old Filene's store, the 685-foot spire opened in 2016 as the tallest residential building in Boston. The glassy tower's trapezoidal shape, including staggered facets like creases in paper, helped it blend with the original Filene's building next-door, allowing it to act as a kind of bridge between downtown Boston way back in the day and in the early 21st century.

2. One Dalton

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1 Dalton St
Boston, MA 02199

The (deep breath) Four Seasons Hotel & Private Residences, One Dalton Street is supposed to be Boston's third-tallest tower when it opens in 2018 (it's under construction now). That will also make it the tallest building constructed in the city since 200 Clarendon opened in 1976. A kind of triangular shape and a translucent look will define the 742-foot tower, which Pei Cobb Freed & Partners and Cambridge Seven Associates have designed.

3. MBTA Government Center Station

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100 City Hall Plz
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 222-3200
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The station reopened in March 2016 after a two-year, $82 million renovation. That renovation not only left it with better accessibility and ease of movement, but also set a precedent for how transit stops can (and should) look in the region's denser areas. First, the station’s outward appearance is striking in itself, especially against the drabber Government Center area around it. Second, HDR Inc. designed the station’s glassy head house to facilitate views of the Old North Church from certain points—altogether a neat way of moving people not only physically but aesthetically.

4. GE headquarters

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Necco Ct
Boston, MA 02210

GE’s planned Fort Point headquarters is set to include a new 12-story building as well as two restored buildings originally dating from the early 20th century. In that, the 2.4-acre corporate campus will be a blend of old and new. The new will stand out in no small part due to a sail-like solar “veil” that architect Gensler has planned for the 12-story addition. The illuminated, metallic "GE" is also sure to become a Boston reference point in the vein of Fenway’s Citgo sign.

5. Boston Landing

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180 Guest St
Brighton, MA 02135

The 15.2-acre, under-construction, partially opened Boston Landing already has the look of a landmark, especially when seen from the Mass. Pike coming into Boston. That is because the main building of the 1.43 million-square-foot residential-office-retail-hotel-sports complex, which Elkus Manfredi designed, looks like a spaceship—a kind of futuristic vessel-in-place for a Boston heading into the 21st century, the way people used to design airport terminals when we all thought we’d be living on the moon by the year 2000.

6. The Hub at Causeway

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100 Legends Way
Boston, MA 02114

Like Boston Landing, the multi-building, 1.5 million-square-foot Hub at Causeway on the site of the old Boston Garden is destined to serve as another gateway into Boston (it will look especially striking against the Zakim Bridge). Designed by Gensler, the residential-retail-office complex will also help revitalize a West End that an ill-fated attempt to eradicate urban blight undercut 50-plus years ago. Out with the old, in with the new.

1. Millennium Tower

1 Franklin St, Boston, MA 02110

Designed by Blake Middleton of Handel Architects and built on most of the site of the old Filene's store, the 685-foot spire opened in 2016 as the tallest residential building in Boston. The glassy tower's trapezoidal shape, including staggered facets like creases in paper, helped it blend with the original Filene's building next-door, allowing it to act as a kind of bridge between downtown Boston way back in the day and in the early 21st century.

1 Franklin St
Boston, MA 02110

2. One Dalton

1 Dalton St, Boston, MA 02199

The (deep breath) Four Seasons Hotel & Private Residences, One Dalton Street is supposed to be Boston's third-tallest tower when it opens in 2018 (it's under construction now). That will also make it the tallest building constructed in the city since 200 Clarendon opened in 1976. A kind of triangular shape and a translucent look will define the 742-foot tower, which Pei Cobb Freed & Partners and Cambridge Seven Associates have designed.

1 Dalton St
Boston, MA 02199

3. MBTA Government Center Station

100 City Hall Plz, Boston, MA 02108

The station reopened in March 2016 after a two-year, $82 million renovation. That renovation not only left it with better accessibility and ease of movement, but also set a precedent for how transit stops can (and should) look in the region's denser areas. First, the station’s outward appearance is striking in itself, especially against the drabber Government Center area around it. Second, HDR Inc. designed the station’s glassy head house to facilitate views of the Old North Church from certain points—altogether a neat way of moving people not only physically but aesthetically.

100 City Hall Plz
Boston, MA 02108

4. GE headquarters

Necco Ct, Boston, MA 02210

GE’s planned Fort Point headquarters is set to include a new 12-story building as well as two restored buildings originally dating from the early 20th century. In that, the 2.4-acre corporate campus will be a blend of old and new. The new will stand out in no small part due to a sail-like solar “veil” that architect Gensler has planned for the 12-story addition. The illuminated, metallic "GE" is also sure to become a Boston reference point in the vein of Fenway’s Citgo sign.

Necco Ct
Boston, MA 02210

5. Boston Landing

180 Guest St, Brighton, MA 02135

The 15.2-acre, under-construction, partially opened Boston Landing already has the look of a landmark, especially when seen from the Mass. Pike coming into Boston. That is because the main building of the 1.43 million-square-foot residential-office-retail-hotel-sports complex, which Elkus Manfredi designed, looks like a spaceship—a kind of futuristic vessel-in-place for a Boston heading into the 21st century, the way people used to design airport terminals when we all thought we’d be living on the moon by the year 2000.

180 Guest St
Brighton, MA 02135

6. The Hub at Causeway

100 Legends Way, Boston, MA 02114

Like Boston Landing, the multi-building, 1.5 million-square-foot Hub at Causeway on the site of the old Boston Garden is destined to serve as another gateway into Boston (it will look especially striking against the Zakim Bridge). Designed by Gensler, the residential-retail-office complex will also help revitalize a West End that an ill-fated attempt to eradicate urban blight undercut 50-plus years ago. Out with the old, in with the new.

100 Legends Way
Boston, MA 02114