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An old house with a sign outside that says “Witch House”. Shutterstock

Salem witchcraft sites and other spots to see, mapped

Tourism for the Boston neighbor understandably spikes around Halloween, but there are plenty of non-witch attractions

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Tourism in Salem understandably spikes around Halloween as people queue for tales of the witch trials and executions that gripped Boston’s northern neighbor three centuries ago.

There are plenty of other attractions, though.

These include a world-renown museum, historic homes, and the birthplace of the National Guard. And, yes, there is plenty of stuff about the witchcraft hysteria.

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Proctor's Ledge

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Nineteen people were hanged at this spot in the early 1690s because of bogus witchcraft allegations.

In July 2017, the City of Salem dedicated a formal memorial to those who were murdered.

A woman snapping a photograph of a memorial wall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Stephen Phillips Trust House

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Phillips House is the only mansion along Salem’s bucolic Chestnut Street open to the public.

It is essentially a museum of life in the early 20th century for the well-to-do.

Regular adult admission is $10.

As for the house itself, it started life as part of a Federal estate in South Danvers, moving to Salem via ox sled in the early 19th century.

An elegant federal-style house with four chimneys. Wikipedia Commons

The Witch House

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This house was the longtime home of Jonathan Corwin, one of the most prominent judges during the witch trials of the early 1690s.

Tour the house for information on the trials (regular adult admission is $8.25), but also for a peek at late-17th-century living and architecture. 

The exterior of a 17th-century house. Shutterstock

Gedney House

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The Gedney House dates from 1665, with significant additions in 1712 and 1800.

It is notable for its framing as well as its decorative finishes.

Regular adult admission is $6.  

The exterior of a 17th-century house with a fence in front of it. Wikipedia

Howard Street Cemetery

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The cemetery dates from 1801, and contains the remains of many Salem notables, including relatives of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

But it is perhaps best-known as being the spot (or at least near the spot) that 81-year-old Giles Corey was tortured to death in 1692 for refusing to admit to witchcraft.

He is said to haunt the cemetery. 

A gravestone from the late 1600s.

Peabody Essex Museum

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The world-famous museum is dedicated to Asian art and early American maritime trading.

It is open every day but Monday (unless Monday is a special holiday), and regular adult admission is $15. 

A bird’s-eye photo of a circular staircase in a museum. Moment Editorial/Getty Images

John Ward House

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The house dates from the 1680s and is considered one of the finest extant examples of 17th-century architecture in New England (it’s so old it has touches of post-medieval in its architecture!).

The Peabody Essex Museum owns it. Call the information desk about tours.

Fun fact: The John Ward House used to be across from the jail used during the witch trials, but was subsequently moved to be near the Peabody Essex. 

The exterior of 17th-century house. Wikipedia Commons

Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace

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The author of The Scarlet Letter, among other works, was born in the circa-1750 Georgian house in 1804.

It was moved from Union Street to its present location on the property of the House of the Seven Gables museum in 1958.

The museum’s admission price covers admission to Hawthorne house. 

The exterior of a house dating from the 1750s. Wikipedia Commons

Salem Witch Museum

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As one might expect, the museum dedicated to all things witchery offers extended hours in the run-up to Halloween.

Regular adult admission is $13.

The castle-like exterior of the Salem Witch Museum. Shutterstock

Salem Common

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Several gorgeously notable houses line the public park, but it is perhaps best-known as the birthplace of the National Guard.

The colonial legislature of Massachusetts formed volunteer militias in December 1636, and the first mustering of one of those militias took place on the common in April 1637.

A snow-swept view of Salem Common with a stone gazebo in the middle. Wikipedia Commons

The House of the Seven Gables

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The old colonial mansion dates from the late 1660s, and is now a museum and an educational center with a local focus.

It is also well-known as the setting of an identically named Nathaniel Hawthorne novel.

Regular adult admission is $16.

The exterior of a 17th-century house and the courtyard in front of it. Shutterstock

Proctor's Ledge

A woman snapping a photograph of a memorial wall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Nineteen people were hanged at this spot in the early 1690s because of bogus witchcraft allegations.

In July 2017, the City of Salem dedicated a formal memorial to those who were murdered.

A woman snapping a photograph of a memorial wall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Stephen Phillips Trust House

An elegant federal-style house with four chimneys. Wikipedia Commons

Phillips House is the only mansion along Salem’s bucolic Chestnut Street open to the public.

It is essentially a museum of life in the early 20th century for the well-to-do.

Regular adult admission is $10.

As for the house itself, it started life as part of a Federal estate in South Danvers, moving to Salem via ox sled in the early 19th century.

An elegant federal-style house with four chimneys. Wikipedia Commons

The Witch House

The exterior of a 17th-century house. Shutterstock

This house was the longtime home of Jonathan Corwin, one of the most prominent judges during the witch trials of the early 1690s.

Tour the house for information on the trials (regular adult admission is $8.25), but also for a peek at late-17th-century living and architecture. 

The exterior of a 17th-century house. Shutterstock

Gedney House

The exterior of a 17th-century house with a fence in front of it. Wikipedia

The Gedney House dates from 1665, with significant additions in 1712 and 1800.

It is notable for its framing as well as its decorative finishes.

Regular adult admission is $6.  

The exterior of a 17th-century house with a fence in front of it. Wikipedia

Howard Street Cemetery

A gravestone from the late 1600s.

The cemetery dates from 1801, and contains the remains of many Salem notables, including relatives of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

But it is perhaps best-known as being the spot (or at least near the spot) that 81-year-old Giles Corey was tortured to death in 1692 for refusing to admit to witchcraft.

He is said to haunt the cemetery. 

A gravestone from the late 1600s.

Peabody Essex Museum

A bird’s-eye photo of a circular staircase in a museum. Moment Editorial/Getty Images

The world-famous museum is dedicated to Asian art and early American maritime trading.

It is open every day but Monday (unless Monday is a special holiday), and regular adult admission is $15. 

A bird’s-eye photo of a circular staircase in a museum. Moment Editorial/Getty Images

John Ward House

The exterior of 17th-century house. Wikipedia Commons

The house dates from the 1680s and is considered one of the finest extant examples of 17th-century architecture in New England (it’s so old it has touches of post-medieval in its architecture!).

The Peabody Essex Museum owns it. Call the information desk about tours.

Fun fact: The John Ward House used to be across from the jail used during the witch trials, but was subsequently moved to be near the Peabody Essex. 

The exterior of 17th-century house. Wikipedia Commons

Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace

The exterior of a house dating from the 1750s. Wikipedia Commons

The author of The Scarlet Letter, among other works, was born in the circa-1750 Georgian house in 1804.

It was moved from Union Street to its present location on the property of the House of the Seven Gables museum in 1958.

The museum’s admission price covers admission to Hawthorne house. 

The exterior of a house dating from the 1750s. Wikipedia Commons

Salem Witch Museum

The castle-like exterior of the Salem Witch Museum. Shutterstock

As one might expect, the museum dedicated to all things witchery offers extended hours in the run-up to Halloween.

Regular adult admission is $13.

The castle-like exterior of the Salem Witch Museum. Shutterstock

Salem Common

A snow-swept view of Salem Common with a stone gazebo in the middle. Wikipedia Commons

Several gorgeously notable houses line the public park, but it is perhaps best-known as the birthplace of the National Guard.

The colonial legislature of Massachusetts formed volunteer militias in December 1636, and the first mustering of one of those militias took place on the common in April 1637.

A snow-swept view of Salem Common with a stone gazebo in the middle. Wikipedia Commons

The House of the Seven Gables

The exterior of a 17th-century house and the courtyard in front of it. Shutterstock

The old colonial mansion dates from the late 1660s, and is now a museum and an educational center with a local focus.

It is also well-known as the setting of an identically named Nathaniel Hawthorne novel.

Regular adult admission is $16.

The exterior of a 17th-century house and the courtyard in front of it. Shutterstock