clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
John Hoey/Flickr

Seaport District development: Mapping the biggest projects in the busy Boston enclave

Including a giant hotel

View as Map

The Seaport District is one of Boston’s busiest in terms of new development.

This map charts those major projects either recently underway or approved, including plans for what will be one of the largest hotels in New England and the Seaport’s largest single amount of for-sale housing.

The map does not include projects still on the drawing board, including the last major piece of Seaport Square.

Read More

New York-based developer Tishman Speyer launched sales in late May at the 106-unit condo portion of its Pier 4 complex. Each of the one- to four-bedroom condos will include private outdoor space.

The project will also include a 13-story, 353,000-square-foot office building and approximately 40,000 square feet total of retail and restaurant space.

SHoP and CBT Architects are collaborating on the modern design. Work is supposed to wrap next year.

121 Seaport Boulevard

Copy Link

CBT Architects’ elliptical design for Skanska USA’s 121 Seaport will make the 17-story, 400,000-square-foot tower one of the more interesting-looking new buildings in Boston in a while.

The office tower will include a three-story lobby facing Boston Harbor.

Said lobby will open onto a 70-foot-wide, 20,000-square-foot pedestrian promenade called Harbor Way. Harbor Way, itself under construction, will feature an open-air, public museum with an augmented-reality exhibit detailing the fate of a 19th-century schooner, the remains of which construction workers discovered at the site in May 2016.

The whole thing, tower and plaza, is supposed to open in early 2018.

150 Seaport Boulevard

Copy Link

The Boston Planning & Development Agency in August 2016 signed off on plans to replace the Whiskey Priest and the Atlantic Beer Garden with a glassy condo tower running to 250 feet and 22 floors.

There will be 124 condos total, with 19 designated as affordable. The Cronin Group’s plans also call for 10,700 square feet of retail space on two levels and three levels of underground parking.

The Elkus Manfredi design of 150 Seaport evokes a billowing sail—apropos given the 124-unit tower’s location smack-dab on the waterfront.

Construction has yet to start.

In February, the nonprofit Conservation Law Foundation sued in Suffolk Superior Court to halt 150 Seaport. The group alleges that state environmental officials overstepped their legal authority in approving an amendment to the city’s harbor plan density restrictions.

The tower would severely limit the public’s access to the waterfront, the group says.

Stay tuned.

Echelon Seaport

Copy Link

Los Angeles-based developer Cottonwood Management officially broke ground in mid-June on the 1.3 million-square-foot, three-building project.

It is set to have 733 apartments and condos. Some 448 of those will be condos spread over two towers. According to the Globe, that block will constitute the largest single amount of for-sale housing in the neighborhood.

A third tower will have 285 apartments. The buildings could stretch as high as 21 floors.

Echelon Seaport will include a 19,000-square-foot landscaped plaza accessible to the public and 125,000 square feet of restaurants and retail over two levels. There will also be several hundred parking spaces.

All totaled, it will unfold over 3.5 acres of very, very valuable land at B Street and Seaport Boulevard.

Work is supposed to wrap in early 2020.

KPF

399 Congress Street

Copy Link

Miami-based developer Crescent Heights started construction in early July on the 22-story, 414-unit apartment complex.

The move is the latest in a years-long saga for the site, which has been dubbed the “sausage parcel” for its narrow shape.

A previous developer had planned a hotel there, but the Great Recession—and that unusual shape—croaked the proposal. An subsequent idea for apartments at the site also fell through.

It was not until 2013 that the city did sign off on a plan for 414 apartments, including 60 innovation units and plenty of collaboration-causing common space. Sixty-three of the units will be designated as affordable, including 13 of the innovation units.

It was this proposal as well as the sausage parcel itself that Crescent Heights bought in 2016 for $36 million.

The approximately $200 million project will also include 144 parking spaces in a new three-level garage below the complex and 12,000 square feet of retail and lobby space

Two tall buildings with a plaza and trees out front. Rendering via BldUp

Omni Hotel Seaport

Copy Link

The Massachusetts Port Authority’s board in early April approved plans for a hotel complex on state-owned land at D and Summer streets just across from the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center.

The development is due to have 1,054 rooms as well as a 25,000-square-foot ballroom—Boston’s second-largest, behind only one in the convention center itself—and possibly a skating rink above street level.

The $550 million project, which Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts will spearhead in partnership with local developer the Davis Cos. and hotelier Robin Brown, will also include 120,000 square feet of meeting space, 40,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and an 8,500-square-foot spa and fitness center—all in two 20-story towers.

It’s supposed to open in 2021.

Rendering via Elkus Manfredi

Marine Wharf Hotel

Copy Link

The Boston Planning & Development Agency in late November approved the construction of a hotel complex at 660 Summer Street. Construction is imminent and expected to last two years once it starts.

The 15-story Marine Wharf Hotel will actually be two inns in one: a 245-room Hampton Inn and a 166-room Homewood Suites (411 keys total).

The complex will include 19,300 square feet of amenities, including a fitness center, an indoor pool, and a 500-seat restaurant. There will also be 3,500 square feet of ground-floor retail.

Reebok headquarters

Copy Link

Reebok plans to move into its built-out headquarters at 25 Drydock Avenue this fall.

Gensler, the architect on the buildout, is aiming for innovation and healthiness in the design. Natural light and open space play big roles.

Reebok will occupy 220,000 square feet on five floors of the former military warehouse now known as the Innovation and Design Building.

Rendering courtesy of Gensler

88 Black Falcon Avenue

Copy Link

The Davis Cos. acquired the leasehold in March on this industrial and office building that Massport owns.

The Boston-based developer is moving ahead with a major upgrade of the facilities, most of which have to be used for marine industrial purposes.

Photo via BldUp

Pier 4

New York-based developer Tishman Speyer launched sales in late May at the 106-unit condo portion of its Pier 4 complex. Each of the one- to four-bedroom condos will include private outdoor space.

The project will also include a 13-story, 353,000-square-foot office building and approximately 40,000 square feet total of retail and restaurant space.

SHoP and CBT Architects are collaborating on the modern design. Work is supposed to wrap next year.

121 Seaport Boulevard

CBT Architects’ elliptical design for Skanska USA’s 121 Seaport will make the 17-story, 400,000-square-foot tower one of the more interesting-looking new buildings in Boston in a while.

The office tower will include a three-story lobby facing Boston Harbor.

Said lobby will open onto a 70-foot-wide, 20,000-square-foot pedestrian promenade called Harbor Way. Harbor Way, itself under construction, will feature an open-air, public museum with an augmented-reality exhibit detailing the fate of a 19th-century schooner, the remains of which construction workers discovered at the site in May 2016.

The whole thing, tower and plaza, is supposed to open in early 2018.

150 Seaport Boulevard

The Boston Planning & Development Agency in August 2016 signed off on plans to replace the Whiskey Priest and the Atlantic Beer Garden with a glassy condo tower running to 250 feet and 22 floors.

There will be 124 condos total, with 19 designated as affordable. The Cronin Group’s plans also call for 10,700 square feet of retail space on two levels and three levels of underground parking.

The Elkus Manfredi design of 150 Seaport evokes a billowing sail—apropos given the 124-unit tower’s location smack-dab on the waterfront.

Construction has yet to start.

In February, the nonprofit Conservation Law Foundation sued in Suffolk Superior Court to halt 150 Seaport. The group alleges that state environmental officials overstepped their legal authority in approving an amendment to the city’s harbor plan density restrictions.

The tower would severely limit the public’s access to the waterfront, the group says.

Stay tuned.

Echelon Seaport

Los Angeles-based developer Cottonwood Management officially broke ground in mid-June on the 1.3 million-square-foot, three-building project.

It is set to have 733 apartments and condos. Some 448 of those will be condos spread over two towers. According to the Globe, that block will constitute the largest single amount of for-sale housing in the neighborhood.

A third tower will have 285 apartments. The buildings could stretch as high as 21 floors.

Echelon Seaport will include a 19,000-square-foot landscaped plaza accessible to the public and 125,000 square feet of restaurants and retail over two levels. There will also be several hundred parking spaces.

All totaled, it will unfold over 3.5 acres of very, very valuable land at B Street and Seaport Boulevard.

Work is supposed to wrap in early 2020.

KPF

399 Congress Street

Miami-based developer Crescent Heights started construction in early July on the 22-story, 414-unit apartment complex.

The move is the latest in a years-long saga for the site, which has been dubbed the “sausage parcel” for its narrow shape.

A previous developer had planned a hotel there, but the Great Recession—and that unusual shape—croaked the proposal. An subsequent idea for apartments at the site also fell through.

It was not until 2013 that the city did sign off on a plan for 414 apartments, including 60 innovation units and plenty of collaboration-causing common space. Sixty-three of the units will be designated as affordable, including 13 of the innovation units.

It was this proposal as well as the sausage parcel itself that Crescent Heights bought in 2016 for $36 million.

The approximately $200 million project will also include 144 parking spaces in a new three-level garage below the complex and 12,000 square feet of retail and lobby space

Two tall buildings with a plaza and trees out front. Rendering via BldUp

Omni Hotel Seaport

The Massachusetts Port Authority’s board in early April approved plans for a hotel complex on state-owned land at D and Summer streets just across from the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center.

The development is due to have 1,054 rooms as well as a 25,000-square-foot ballroom—Boston’s second-largest, behind only one in the convention center itself—and possibly a skating rink above street level.

The $550 million project, which Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts will spearhead in partnership with local developer the Davis Cos. and hotelier Robin Brown, will also include 120,000 square feet of meeting space, 40,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and an 8,500-square-foot spa and fitness center—all in two 20-story towers.

It’s supposed to open in 2021.

Rendering via Elkus Manfredi

Marine Wharf Hotel

The Boston Planning & Development Agency in late November approved the construction of a hotel complex at 660 Summer Street. Construction is imminent and expected to last two years once it starts.

The 15-story Marine Wharf Hotel will actually be two inns in one: a 245-room Hampton Inn and a 166-room Homewood Suites (411 keys total).

The complex will include 19,300 square feet of amenities, including a fitness center, an indoor pool, and a 500-seat restaurant. There will also be 3,500 square feet of ground-floor retail.

Reebok headquarters

Reebok plans to move into its built-out headquarters at 25 Drydock Avenue this fall.

Gensler, the architect on the buildout, is aiming for innovation and healthiness in the design. Natural light and open space play big roles.

Reebok will occupy 220,000 square feet on five floors of the former military warehouse now known as the Innovation and Design Building.

Rendering courtesy of Gensler

88 Black Falcon Avenue

The Davis Cos. acquired the leasehold in March on this industrial and office building that Massport owns.

The Boston-based developer is moving ahead with a major upgrade of the facilities, most of which have to be used for marine industrial purposes.

Photo via BldUp