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The Hub's Public Art, Circa Now: Monks, Bells and Murals

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'Tis been two years since our last mapping of the region's notable public art, and a lot's been unveiled since then. So here comes Curbed Boston Public Art, 2013, with additions like Monks Garden at the Isabelle Stewart Gardner, the statue of Yaz outside Fenway, and the new Dewey Square mural that everyone breathed a sigh of relief over. There are also old favorites like the giant Washington in the Public Garden and Galaxy in Kendall Square. Bask.

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Alexander Hamilton Statue

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William Rimmer sculpted this granite monument during the Civil War, deliberately draping the first Treasury secretary in folds reminiscent of Roman imperial robes.

George Washington Equestrian Statue

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At 38 feet high (with 11 feet underground mooring it), this bronze monument depicting the first president in his Revolutionary garb is one of Boston’s biggest single pieces of public art. It was sculpted by Thomas Ball.

Garden Of Remembrance

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Crafted by Victor Walker in pink granite, this monument in the Public Garden honors the more than 200 people with Massachusetts ties who were murdered on Sept. 11, 2001.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

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The elaborate memorial on Flagstaff Hill, erected in 1877, served as a model for Civil War monuments nationwide (not least because it commemorated ordinary soldiers as well as top officers).

General Hooker Statue

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Unveiled in 1903, it commemorates Joseph Hooker, who commanded the Army of the Potomac in 1863, declaring, “May God have mercy on General Lee, for I will have none.”

Robert Gould Shaw Memorial

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Perhaps the most famous Civil War memorial in New England, thanks to the movie "Glory," the bronze relief by Augustus Saint-Gaudens commemorates the first African-American regiment in the U.S. Army.

The Charlestown Bells

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The interactive bells designed by Paul Matisse, grandson of Henri, along the Charles River Dam were recently restored.

Revolutionary Figures in Fort Washington Park

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Remarkably creepy and cool at the same time, these five life-size painted-steel silhouettes—four minutemen and a Victorian-era woman—commemorate George Washington’s siege of Boston in 1775. Designed by Madeline Lord in the late 1980s, they are spread over Fort Washington Park.

International Harbor Arts Outdoor Gallery

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A year-round display at the 14-acre Boston Harbor Shipyard, this features 2D and 3D works by 30 artists from three continents. And—you guessed it—each work emphasizes the roles of oceans, harbors, rivers, etc.

Using steel, steam, light, honey locust trees and greenwave shrubs in Thomas J. Murphy Park, a team of M.I.T. artists in 1990 collaborated with landscape architects, urban designers and engineers to make this multi-stage work more akin to a Kiss concert than to public art.

Monks Garden

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The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum unveiled the redesign of the gardens in September. The new greenery was designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh (he put the chairs in Harvard Yard).

Carl Yastrzemski Statue

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The statue of the Red Sox great was unveiled in September outside of Gate B at Fenway.

The New England Holocaust Memorial

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The powerfully evocative memorial to the victims of German atrocities is open 24-7.

Pear Statue

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It's certainly... interesting, this bronze depiction of a giant Clapp pear unveiled in 2007 by Somerville artist Laura Baring-Gould.

Everyday Is Fabulous

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Isn’t it, though? This is probably our favorite of the city’s paint boxes, a trippy mélange by Yuko Adachi.

Dewey Square Mural

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The Globe's Sebastian Smee likened this gray-and-white mural to "a giant shadow cast by a dandelion." Designed by Matthew Ritchie and unveiled this summer, it replaced Os Gemeos' more colorful mural that looked like a terrorist to some but that always looked like Stewie from "Family Guy" to us.

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Alexander Hamilton Statue

William Rimmer sculpted this granite monument during the Civil War, deliberately draping the first Treasury secretary in folds reminiscent of Roman imperial robes.

George Washington Equestrian Statue

At 38 feet high (with 11 feet underground mooring it), this bronze monument depicting the first president in his Revolutionary garb is one of Boston’s biggest single pieces of public art. It was sculpted by Thomas Ball.

Garden Of Remembrance

Crafted by Victor Walker in pink granite, this monument in the Public Garden honors the more than 200 people with Massachusetts ties who were murdered on Sept. 11, 2001.

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

The elaborate memorial on Flagstaff Hill, erected in 1877, served as a model for Civil War monuments nationwide (not least because it commemorated ordinary soldiers as well as top officers).

General Hooker Statue

Unveiled in 1903, it commemorates Joseph Hooker, who commanded the Army of the Potomac in 1863, declaring, “May God have mercy on General Lee, for I will have none.”

Robert Gould Shaw Memorial

Perhaps the most famous Civil War memorial in New England, thanks to the movie "Glory," the bronze relief by Augustus Saint-Gaudens commemorates the first African-American regiment in the U.S. Army.

The Charlestown Bells

The interactive bells designed by Paul Matisse, grandson of Henri, along the Charles River Dam were recently restored.

Revolutionary Figures in Fort Washington Park

Remarkably creepy and cool at the same time, these five life-size painted-steel silhouettes—four minutemen and a Victorian-era woman—commemorate George Washington’s siege of Boston in 1775. Designed by Madeline Lord in the late 1980s, they are spread over Fort Washington Park.

International Harbor Arts Outdoor Gallery

A year-round display at the 14-acre Boston Harbor Shipyard, this features 2D and 3D works by 30 artists from three continents. And—you guessed it—each work emphasizes the roles of oceans, harbors, rivers, etc.

Galaxy

Using steel, steam, light, honey locust trees and greenwave shrubs in Thomas J. Murphy Park, a team of M.I.T. artists in 1990 collaborated with landscape architects, urban designers and engineers to make this multi-stage work more akin to a Kiss concert than to public art.

Monks Garden

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum unveiled the redesign of the gardens in September. The new greenery was designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh (he put the chairs in Harvard Yard).

Carl Yastrzemski Statue

The statue of the Red Sox great was unveiled in September outside of Gate B at Fenway.

The New England Holocaust Memorial

The powerfully evocative memorial to the victims of German atrocities is open 24-7.

Pear Statue

It's certainly... interesting, this bronze depiction of a giant Clapp pear unveiled in 2007 by Somerville artist Laura Baring-Gould.

Everyday Is Fabulous

Isn’t it, though? This is probably our favorite of the city’s paint boxes, a trippy mélange by Yuko Adachi.

Dewey Square Mural

The Globe's Sebastian Smee likened this gray-and-white mural to "a giant shadow cast by a dandelion." Designed by Matthew Ritchie and unveiled this summer, it replaced Os Gemeos' more colorful mural that looked like a terrorist to some but that always looked like Stewie from "Family Guy" to us.