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A giant sculpture of a pear in Boston. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Where to cry in public in the Boston area, mapped

These handy spots include Fenway Park, the Commonwealth Avenue Mall, and, of course, the T

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It’s rough out there, and sometimes you just need a good place to let it all out. These are the best spots for crying in public in the Boston region.

All of them are free—or close to it—because you have enough to worry about.

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Cambridge Common

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The 16-acre expanse just off Harvard Square never seems to be that full of people. This a quiet outdoor spot, then, for gentle sobbing.

Plus, when you’re all done, there’s quite a bit of history to take in, including a major Civil War monument and a trio of British cannon that George Washington’s army seized in 1776.

A large monument in Cambridge Common. The monument is surrounded by a fence and a courtyard. There are trees surrounding the courtyard. Shutterstock

Fenway Park bleachers

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No one will notice the tears in this dense, open, and often rowdy seating area in America’s oldest major-league park—unless it’s a particularly rough game for the Red Sox and most fans split by the top of the seventh (which has become increasingly likely this season).

Franklin Park Zoo

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This expanse provides a perfect habitat for a kind of rolling, strolling cry. Enter through Franklin Park itself for even more buildup. The laughter of large groups of children might cheer you a bit as you finish.

A frog sits in contemplation near blades of grass at Franklin Park Zoo. Shutterstock

Charles River Esplanade

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This approximately 3-mile expanse can be revisited time and again for the purpose of a big cry.

It’s also perfect for plaintive gazes into the timeless currents of the Charles.

Mind the geese droppings, though.

People ride bicycles along a river esplanade. The bike path has grass on both sides. There are trees on one side of the path. Shutterstock

Commonwealth Avenue Mall

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The 32-acre ribbon provides the perfect mix of relatively quiet seclusion and exposure to the urban elements.

Plus, it and the surrounding area are very pedestrian friendly.

A bronze sculpture of a seated man on a pedestrian mall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Bates Reading Room in the Boston Public Library

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The barrel-vaulted ceiling of this grand room in this grand library provides the perfect echo chamber for your sobs—for when you just want someone to finally notice.

A cavernous reading room in a library, and people reading in it at rows of tables. Shutterstock

The Orange Line

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What else are you going to do on it—get where you’re going?

Boston’s Orange Line zipping through a station. Shutterstock

Park Street Station

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These busy platforms in this busy station are the perfect places for when you don’t want anyone to hear you bleating. Never in a crowd do you feel so alone ... and all that.

Plus, Park Street is one of the oldest subway stations in the Western Hemisphere.

The interior of Park Street Station in Boston. There is a train on a track. The train is silver and green. People are walking along the track platforms. Shutterstock

Edward Everett Square

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This is another secluded spot out in the open. No one will ever think that someone came to cry amid the whimsy of that delightful pear sculpture.

A giant sculpture of a pear in Boston. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Piers Park

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This barely decade-old waterfront park affords fabulous views of the current and future Boston skyline.

Weep at the grandeur of humankind and despair of its mortality.

Or just gently contemplate the state of things. You won’t be bothered.

In the foreground is a pier at Piers Park in Boston. There are boats on the water. In the background is the city skyline of Boston with many tall buildings. Shutterstock

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Cambridge Common

A large monument in Cambridge Common. The monument is surrounded by a fence and a courtyard. There are trees surrounding the courtyard. Shutterstock

The 16-acre expanse just off Harvard Square never seems to be that full of people. This a quiet outdoor spot, then, for gentle sobbing.

Plus, when you’re all done, there’s quite a bit of history to take in, including a major Civil War monument and a trio of British cannon that George Washington’s army seized in 1776.

A large monument in Cambridge Common. The monument is surrounded by a fence and a courtyard. There are trees surrounding the courtyard. Shutterstock

Fenway Park bleachers

No one will notice the tears in this dense, open, and often rowdy seating area in America’s oldest major-league park—unless it’s a particularly rough game for the Red Sox and most fans split by the top of the seventh (which has become increasingly likely this season).

Franklin Park Zoo

A frog sits in contemplation near blades of grass at Franklin Park Zoo. Shutterstock

This expanse provides a perfect habitat for a kind of rolling, strolling cry. Enter through Franklin Park itself for even more buildup. The laughter of large groups of children might cheer you a bit as you finish.

A frog sits in contemplation near blades of grass at Franklin Park Zoo. Shutterstock

Charles River Esplanade

People ride bicycles along a river esplanade. The bike path has grass on both sides. There are trees on one side of the path. Shutterstock

This approximately 3-mile expanse can be revisited time and again for the purpose of a big cry.

It’s also perfect for plaintive gazes into the timeless currents of the Charles.

Mind the geese droppings, though.

People ride bicycles along a river esplanade. The bike path has grass on both sides. There are trees on one side of the path. Shutterstock

Commonwealth Avenue Mall

A bronze sculpture of a seated man on a pedestrian mall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

The 32-acre ribbon provides the perfect mix of relatively quiet seclusion and exposure to the urban elements.

Plus, it and the surrounding area are very pedestrian friendly.

A bronze sculpture of a seated man on a pedestrian mall. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Bates Reading Room in the Boston Public Library

A cavernous reading room in a library, and people reading in it at rows of tables. Shutterstock

The barrel-vaulted ceiling of this grand room in this grand library provides the perfect echo chamber for your sobs—for when you just want someone to finally notice.

A cavernous reading room in a library, and people reading in it at rows of tables. Shutterstock

The Orange Line

Boston’s Orange Line zipping through a station. Shutterstock

What else are you going to do on it—get where you’re going?

Boston’s Orange Line zipping through a station. Shutterstock

Park Street Station

The interior of Park Street Station in Boston. There is a train on a track. The train is silver and green. People are walking along the track platforms. Shutterstock

These busy platforms in this busy station are the perfect places for when you don’t want anyone to hear you bleating. Never in a crowd do you feel so alone ... and all that.

Plus, Park Street is one of the oldest subway stations in the Western Hemisphere.

The interior of Park Street Station in Boston. There is a train on a track. The train is silver and green. People are walking along the track platforms. Shutterstock

Edward Everett Square

A giant sculpture of a pear in Boston. Boston Globe via Getty Images

This is another secluded spot out in the open. No one will ever think that someone came to cry amid the whimsy of that delightful pear sculpture.

A giant sculpture of a pear in Boston. Boston Globe via Getty Images

Piers Park

In the foreground is a pier at Piers Park in Boston. There are boats on the water. In the background is the city skyline of Boston with many tall buildings. Shutterstock

This barely decade-old waterfront park affords fabulous views of the current and future Boston skyline.

Weep at the grandeur of humankind and despair of its mortality.

Or just gently contemplate the state of things. You won’t be bothered.

In the foreground is a pier at Piers Park in Boston. There are boats on the water. In the background is the city skyline of Boston with many tall buildings. Shutterstock